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classictrek:

Select Japanese episode titles from the first season of Star Trek.

(via plaidshirtjimkirk)

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uss-gumdrop:

Some slashy candids for K/S Day!

(via plaidshirtjimkirk)

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lokihiddleston:

purepowerful:

love how he says this line.

And his voice, this scene, so difficult

(Source: lokihiddleston, via spockitlockitdropit)

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comedycentral:

Jon told off Shakespeare last night on The Daily Show.

(via balverine)

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swamped:

Julian FaulhaberRestaurant, 2004

swamped:

Julian Faulhaber
Restaurant, 2004

(via trinketchick)

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mutantlexi:

emillerz:

espressobean:

I was playing badminton yesterday and all I could think about was this stupid gif.


I’ll freely admit… this is one of the greatest gifs, ever.

mutantlexi:

emillerz:

espressobean:

I was playing badminton yesterday and all I could think about was this stupid gif.

I’ll freely admit… this is one of the greatest gifs, ever.

(Source: seigneurruei, via strawberry-cum)

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scarpucci:

Mahmud of Ghazni and Malik Ayaz.
Mahmud of Ghazni founded the Ghaznavid Empire and ruled as a sultan. He fell in love with Malik Ayaz, a Turkish slave, and their relationship became the epitome of idealized love in Islamic legend and Sufi literature. As the story goes, Ayaz asked Mahmud who the most powerful man in the kingdom was. When the sultan replied that it was himself, Ayaz corrected him, claiming that in fact Ayaz was the most powerful, since Mahmud was his slave. The “slave to a slave” became a favorite trope in Persian literature. R.G.L

scarpucci:

Mahmud of Ghazni and Malik Ayaz.

Mahmud of Ghazni founded the Ghaznavid Empire and ruled as a sultan. He fell in love with Malik Ayaz, a Turkish slave, and their relationship became the epitome of idealized love in Islamic legend and Sufi literature. As the story goes, Ayaz asked Mahmud who the most powerful man in the kingdom was. When the sultan replied that it was himself, Ayaz corrected him, claiming that in fact Ayaz was the most powerful, since Mahmud was his slave. The “slave to a slave” became a favorite trope in Persian literature. R.G.L

(Source: witharab)

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Anonymous said: Kiss Art Challenge, 7, Spirk please! Love your art so much btw!

quintotriticale:

How ‘bout we add in some mind meld action also??????

Also thank you or you kind words wow you sweet

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magictransistor:

George Psalmanazar. Illustrations for his Description of Formosa. London. 1704.  

Story here

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crotchetybushtit:


Real life “Rosie the Riveter” - Tennessee, 1943.
From the Library of Congress collection, 1930’s-1940’s in Color. 

GLORIFY THE SHIT OUT OF THIS IMAGE

crotchetybushtit:

Real life “Rosie the Riveter” - Tennessee, 1943.

From the Library of Congress collection, 1930’s-1940’s in Color

GLORIFY THE SHIT OUT OF THIS IMAGE

(via vibrant-oxymoron)